How To Tutorial: Perl Statements


"Find Out How You Can Use The Perl Statements In The Most Frequent Situations You’re Confronted With When You Write A Perl Script … See In Minutes A Lot Of Complete Code Solutions From Which You Can Copy Pieces of Code And Paste Them Directly In Your Own Script"
The statements are one of the most important topics in the Perl language, actually for any programming language. You use statements in order to process or evaluate the expressions. Perl uses the values returned by statements to evaluate or process other statements, and so on.



This How To Tutorial answers the most frequently questions regarding the use of the statements in Perl language.

A lot of examples about how to use bare blocks, compound statements, conditional and looping statements, loop controls and statement modifiers are provided. The examples are accompanied by detailed explanations to help you better understand the topics.

Through other topics, a special attention is given to the main statements of the Perl language: if, unless, switch, for, foreach, while, do-while, until, and do-until. This eBook supplies a lot of examples about how to use the statements with files, with the most important functions of the Perl language, with simple or complex data structures. To give you an example, the use of the foreach statement is illustrated in almost 100 examples that cover different ways of using it in your scripts.

Complete solutions are provided for almost all the examples. Each example can be tested, modified and run individually. Every example shows you a way to resolve a specific problem, allowing you to find out a quick answer to your problem or question.


Now You Can Save Time And Find In Minutes The Answer To Your Question

If you want to improve your programming skill regarding the use of the statements in Perl in different contexts, you’ll find a real help in this eBook. I chose for you the most frequent questions regarding the use of the Perl statements and answered all with the appropriate examples.

All right, there are plenty of eBooks regarding Perl around here, why a new eBook? What is there so interesting inside it?

If you look at the Table of Contents there is a chance not to get its great features and how I build it. Honestly, it’s not me, but you, my visitors who made it. I answered your queries only.

Please wait, don’t go, I’m not joking, I really mean it. Let me explain.

I’ll give you an example using the foreach statement. If you have a look at my Table of Contents, the 3.4.2.2 paragraph is about the foreach statement and it includes 58 different subtopics regarding this statement.

I received on my site thousands of searches regarding how to use the foreach statement in Perl. I chose the most frequent ones and I illustrated them through fully commented examples. The 58 subtopics mentioned above are the most frequent topics about the use of foreach in Perl.

There are great chances to find the appropriate answer in this eBook for any question you have regarding the use of the foreach statement in Perl!

To be more explicit, look at the following table and see what I mean:

Your search query
my eBook paragraph
perl foreach last3.4.2.2.11.
perl foreach continue3.4.2.2.13.
nested foreach loop3.4.2.2.15.
perl two dimensional array foreach3.4.2.2.49.
foreach perl $_3.4.2.2.4.
concatenate foreach perl3.4.2.2.27.
ending foreach in perl3.4.2.2.11.
foreach loop through hash perl3.4.2.2.33.
foreach to print key/value pairs perl3.4.2.2.35.
. . .

and the list could continue.

But there is much more in the eBook than you can see in the Table of Contents. For example, a lot of code snippets throughout this eBook are using the regexp engine and you can’t see this by skimming the Table of Contents.

It’s possible that not all the topics are entirely covered, but I’ll improve soon this version so you can download for free the upgraded versions (as I’ll mention below, you can download for free this eBook still eight times).

Of course you can continue searching trough the forums to find the answer of your question but in this case you need to choose, test and interpret yourself the answer provided in the forums.

In this eBook I give you a lot of working code that you can implement in minutes in your script. And not only that, all the provided snippet codes are fully functional, i.e can be copied and tested in your command line window. Next, they can be integrated in a script and uploaded to your site.

In order to make the scripts very easy to understand, I commented in detail each code snippet so you will not have any problem to understand and implement it.

Table Of Contents

I think you can use this eBook to find out very fast how to use the Perl statements in different situations. Please take a look at the table of contents to see what I mean:

1.Copyright
2.Introduction
  2.1.How to run the examples included in this eBook
    2.1.1. How to run the script in Windows
    2.1.2. How to run the script in Linux
3. Perl statements
  3.1. Perl simple statements
  3.2. Perl blocks
  3.3. Perl Compound Statements
  3.4. Perl Control Statements
    3.4.1. Perl Conditional Statements
      3.4.1.1. if
        3.4.1.1.1. The syntax forms
        3.4.1.1.2.How to use a simple if statement
        3.4.1.1.3.How to use if with the else clause
        3.4.1.1.4.How to use if with a { do nothing } block
        3.4.1.1.5.How to use if with the elsif and else clauses
        3.4.1.1.6.How to use if as an expression modifier
        3.4.1.1.7.How to use if with the exists function
        3.4.1.1.8.How to use if with the next and last loop controls
        3.4.1.1.9.How to use if with defined
        3.4.1.1.10.How to use the operators with the if statement
        3.4.1.1.11.How to use if with the pattern binding operator =~
        3.4.1.1.12.How to use if with the AND (&&) short-circuit operator
        3.4.1.1.13.How to use if with the OR (||) short-circuit operator
        3.4.1.1.14.How to use if statement to find if a variable is reference
        3.4.1.1.15.How to use a function with the if statement
        3.4.1.1.16.How to use the if statement with regular expressions
      3.4.1.2. unless
        3.4.1.2.1. The syntax forms
        3.4.1.2.2. How to use a simple unless statement
        3.4.1.2.3. How to use unless with the else clause
        3.4.1.2.4. How to use unless with the elsif and else clauses
        3.4.1.2.5. How to use unless as an expression modifier
        3.4.1.2.6. How to use unless with the exists function
        3.4.1.2.7. How to use unless with the next loop control
        3.4.1.2.8. How to use unless with defined
      3.4.1.3. switch
        3.4.1.3.1. How to emulate switch using a bare block and && operator
        3.4.1.3.2. How to emulate switch using an if modifier inside a while loop
        3.4.1.3.3. How to emulate a switch statement using a hash structure
        3.4.1.3.4. How to use the Perl Switch module
        3.4.1.3.5. How to use switch starting with the 5.10 Perl version
    3.4.2. Perl Loop Statements
      3.4.2.1. for
        3.4.2.1.1. The syntax forms
        3.4.2.1.2. A simple for statement example
        3.4.2.1.3. A for infinite loop
        3.4.2.1.4. How to use the for statement to print the keys of a hash
        3.4.2.1.5. How to print a two dimensional array using a nested for
      3.4.2.2. foreach
        3.4.2.2.1. The syntax forms
        3.4.2.2.2. How to use foreach with the iterator variable
        3.4.2.2.3. How to use foreach as a modifier of a statement
        3.4.2.2.4. How to use foreach with the special variable $_
        3.4.2.2.5. How to use foreach and $#
        3.4.2.2.6. How to use foreach with the .. range operator
        3.4.2.2.7. How to use foreach and @_
        3.4.2.2.8. How to use foreach with my or local
        3.4.2.2.9. How to use the foreach loop statement with STDIN
        3.4.2.2.10. How to use the foreach loop with the next loop control
        3.4.2.2.11. How to use the foreach loop with the last loop control
        3.4.2.2.12. How to use the foreach loop with the redo loop control
        3.4.2.2.13. How to use the foreach loop with the continue clause
        3.4.2.2.14. How to quit a foreach loop
        3.4.2.2.15. How to use nested foreach loops
        3.4.2.2.16. How to use the foreach loop with a list
        3.4.2.2.17. How to use the foreach loop with an array
        3.4.2.2.18. How to use foreach to traverse an array in a reversed order
        3.4.2.2.19. How to use foreach and array references
        3.4.2.2.20. How to create an array inside a foreach loop
        3.4.2.2.21. How to use foreach to modify the elements of an array
        3.4.2.2.22. How to use foreach to print all array elements
        3.4.2.2.23. How to use foreach beginning from a given index of an array
        3.4.2.2.24. Find a pattern running foreach across an array
        3.4.2.2.25. How to use foreach and delete on an array
        3.4.2.2.26. How to use foreach with two arrays of same size
        3.4.2.2.27. How to use foreach and the arrays concatenation
        3.4.2.2.28. Using foreach to convert an array to lowercase/uppercase
        3.4.2.2.29. Using foreach to find all the odd, even elements in a list
        3.4.2.2.30. How to find max and min using a foreach loop
        3.4.2.2.31. How to use foreach with a scalar
        3.4.2.2.32. Find the union, intersection and difference of two arrays
        3.4.2.2.33. How to traverse a hash using foreach
        3.4.2.2.34. How to create a hash inside a foreach loop
        3.4.2.2.35. How to use foreach and keys function to print a hash
        3.4.2.2.36. How to sort a hash by keys in a foreach loop
        3.4.2.2.37. How to sort a hash by values in a foreach loop
        3.4.2.2.38. How to use foreach and delete on a hash
        3.4.2.2.39. How to use hash references inside a foreach loop
        3.4.2.2.40. How to use foreach and chomp
        3.4.2.2.41. How to check defined in a foreach loop
        3.4.2.2.42. How to use foreach and substr
        3.4.2.2.43. How to use foreach and length
        3.4.2.2.44. How to use foreach and split
        3.4.2.2.45. foreach and pop, push, shift, unshift example
        3.4.2.2.46. How to use foreach and push
        3.4.2.2.47. How to use nested foreach loops to print a 3d-array
        3.4.2.2.48. How to use nested foreach to print a 3d-hash
        3.4.2.2.49. How to use foreach with an AOA (array of arrays)
        3.4.2.2.50. How to use foreach with an AOH (array of hashes)
        3.4.2.2.51. How to use foreach with a HOA (hash of arrays)
        3.4.2.2.52. How to use foreach with a HOH (hash of hashes)
        3.4.2.2.53. Which is the difference between foreach and for
        3.4.2.2.54. foreach versus grep
        3.4.2.2.55. foreach versus map
        3.4.2.2.56. foreach versus while
        3.4.2.2.57. How to emulate a switch statement in a foreach loop
        3.4.2.2.58. How to use the goto statement inside a foreach block
      3.4.2.3. while
        3.4.2.3.1. The syntax forms
        3.4.2.3.2. A simple while statement example
        3.4.2.3.3. How to use while when condition expression is false initially
        3.4.2.3.4. The while statement and an infinite loop
        3.4.2.3.5. How to use while with my in the conditional expression
        3.4.2.3.6. How to simulate a for statement using a while loop
        3.4.2.3.7. How to use the while statement with and $_
        3.4.2.3.8. How to use while with the diamond operator <>
        3.4.2.3.9. How to use the while statement with @ARGV and <>
        3.4.2.3.10. How to use while with chomp, lc and STDIN
        3.4.2.3.11. How to use while with defined and STDIN
        3.4.2.3.12. How to use while as a modifier
        3.4.2.3.13. How to split a file record on columns in a while loop
        3.4.2.3.14. How to skip blank lines in a while loop
        3.4.2.3.15. How to quit a while loop using the last loop control
        3.4.2.3.16. How to use the next loop control inside a while loop
        3.4.2.3.17. How to use the redo loop control inside a while loop
        3.4.2.3.18. How to use the while loop with the continue clause
        3.4.2.3.19. How to control the while loop flow with next, last and redo
        3.4.2.3.20. How to use nested while loops with labels
        3.4.2.3.21. How to use while with push and shift
        3.4.2.3.22. How to print a hash using each and while
        3.4.2.3.23. How to find the while odd and even iterations
        3.4.2.3.24. How to find a substring in a string using a while loop
        3.4.2.3.25. How to use while with pattern matching
        3.4.2.3.26. How to use while and defined with an array
        3.4.2.3.27. How to use while to generate an AOA (array of arrays)
        3.4.2.3.28. How to use while to generate an AOH (array of hashes)
      3.4.2.4. do-while
        3.4.2.4.1. The syntax form
        3.4.2.4.2. A simple do-while statement example
        3.4.2.4.3. How to use the do-while statement with STDIN
        3.4.2.4.4. How to use do-while with the loop controls
      3.4.2.5. until
        3.4.2.5.1. The syntax forms
        3.4.2.5.2. A simple until statement example
        3.4.2.5.3. The until statement and an infinite loop
        3.4.2.5.4. How to use until and STDIN
        3.4.2.5.5. How to use until with next, last, redo and continue
        3.4.2.5.6. How to use the until statement with arrays
        3.4.2.5.7. How to use the until statement with hashes
        3.4.2.5.8. How to use until as a modifier
      3.4.2.6. do-until
        3.4.2.6.1. The syntax form
        3.4.2.6.2. A simple do-until statement example
        3.4.2.6.3. How to use do-until in conjunction with arrays and hashes
        3.4.2.6.4. How to use do-until construct with the loop controls
    3.4.3. Perl Loop Controls
    3.4.4. Perl Jump Statements
    3.4.5. Perl Modifiers

But there’s a lot more. You’ll find a lot of examples about how to use different functions including delete, substr, length, chomp, pop, push, split and many others; how to use the input standard file handle, the diamond operator, regular expressions, how to work with multidimensional arrays and hashes, how to use the special variables $_, $/, @_ and much more.

And as a bonus, I give you a "Perl Glossary" eBook to help you understand better the topics included in my tutorial.

A Sample From My eBook

To have a first look about what you could expect to find inside, I invite you to download for free a sample from my "Perl Statements How To Tutorial" and "Perl Glossary" eBooks.

What You’ll Get

  • A 163 page "Perl statements How To Tutorial" eBook (PDF format)
  • I prepared a bonus for you – an additional glossary eBook (PDF format) meant to help you understand the topics included in this eBook tutorial
  • After I’ll modify or extend the eBook (maybe at your suggestion), the download link provided will let you download for free the upgraded version - please note that the download link will expire after 9 attempts
I intend to enlarge this eBook with a lot of other useful examples, but I am going to increase the price, too. Buy this eBook now! And you can download it for maximum 9 times, having free access to the following upgrades.If you consider that this book is valuable or you have some suggestions to improve its content, please send me some feedback through my contact page.



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PS. Don’t forget that this eBook will help you with a lot of examples about how to use one of the most important Perl topics: the statements. You’ll use the Perl statements again and again, with functions, strings, arrays or hashes and you need to find working examples quickly about how to implement it.

I am a computer professional and my background in the computer science field and at the University allows me to offer you a valuable resource that can make your programming tasks easier.

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